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big yerba mate leaf

A big leaf of Ilex Paraguariensis, a.k.a. yerba mate.

Before our longtime mate scientist, Garth Hokanson, retired from our Guayaki family last month, he gifted us with some vital know-how on growing and maintaining yerba mate plants. Here’s his vital guide to learn more about the plant, great if you’re ready to cultivate your own Ilex Paraguariensis.

The Cultivation of Yerba Mate

By Garth G Hokanson

Yerba mate is native to a specific region of the world, principally Paraguay, Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. This region is similar to what we call the Mediterranean climate. Coastal California with its Mediterranean climate is a perfect location to grow yerba mate plants (Ilex paraguariensis).

Mate needs shady conditions with well drained soils. It likes frequent watering. The more shade, the larger and darker green the leaves grow. Plants grown in full sun will have small, narrow dry leaves that are bleached of some of their rich green color.

Yerba mate is part of the Holly (Ilex) family. The plants are dioecious, which means that seeds may produce male plants or female plants. Each plant will have only one sex. So if you eventually would like to harvest seeds from your own plants, you need a number of plants to hopefully get at least one male and one female. Flowers are tiny white star shapes. Not very showy as they occur on the stems, under the leaves, not at the tips or a flowering stalk. Berries start off green, turn a mustard color and then red and eventually with age to a dark purple red. At any of the red stages, harvest the seeds and dry them for several weeks. The fruit pulp which protects the seeds can be removed from the seeds to speed up germination, or you can just plant the entire dried berry.

Mate can be grown from seed or propagated by cuttings. Seed takes nearly 12 months to germinate. Seeds are about the size of grape seeds and should be planted twice their diameter deep, in a very fertile planting mix. Do not start them in an inert mix, like perlite or vermiculite. Since the plants are so small when they germinate, one must leave them several months in the seed flat until they get the second set of leaves before transplanting them to individual pots. The seed has a short life. Six months is about the longest you can get good germination from yerba mate seed.

Seedlings are very fragile for the first 2-3 years. They are best grown in a cold frame, hot bed or greenhouse for the first year.  The fragile plants are susceptible to snails, slugs and pill bugs, which can quickly eat the tops of the seedlings. Once the apex is gone, the plant will die. So take measures to guard against these pests. Growth of a seedling is very slow. Only about an inch a year for the first 2 to 3 years. When plants are 5 to 7 years old, you can expect between 2 to 4 feet of growth a year.

Propagation by cuttings is another way to start yerba mate. Half ripe cuttings about 4 inches long will root in perlite in about 6-10 months. Unlike the seedlings, cuttings are best in an inert media. As soon as the cuttings produce roots, they can be transplanted to a small pot with soil. Cuttings will give you a more robust plant but seedlings tend to have a vigor that outgrows the cuttings the first years.

Yerba Mate can withstand temperatures down to 15 degrees. So essentially most of coastal California up to Sonoma County are perfect locations. In the spring, summer and fall, the plants are a dark green with shiny leaves. At the first outbreak of cold weather the stems will start turning red and new growth will turn a purple to dark red color. This is simply the winter color and is normal. Extended freezes may cause plants to lose leaves, but they will grow back when warmer weather comes again. Plants do not need to be covered, if planted in the ground during bouts of cold weather. But it is critical that they stay watered, as a frozen root ball will remain at 32 degrees when air temperatures drop to the 20s. If you are growing mate in containers, then it is advised that you move the containers close to the house, under a roof eve or patio to help protect from extended cold weather.

Yerba mate comes from rainforests where dead tree trunks and leaves are continuously decomposing creating humic acid and a rich acidic soil. So a regular fertilizing plan is needed if you want to see rapid growth of your plants. Foliar fertilizer sprays or granular fertilizers will do fine. Choose fertilizers that are balanced, where the first number (Nitrogen) is approximately twice the second two numbers (Phosphorus & Potassium). Combinations like 18-6-5 or  20-10-10,  etc. are examples of combinations to look for. The key is to always keep the first number Nitrogen) high, which is responsible for stem and leaf growth. Turf fertilizer is too strong.  Bulb food 0-10-10 or similar low Nitrogen combinations will cause the plant to stop elongating and stop producing leaves and to begin producing seed, which is not what you want for the first 5 years.

When your plant grows large enough to harvest-about 4-5 feet, prune the plant back as you would a small fruit tree, leaving a strong limb base for future growth. Leaves and small stems can be separated from the thicker branches. Discard the thick branches and rinse the leaves and stems with cool water and allow them to dry. For best results, once leaves are dry, you can put the leaves on a cookie sheet and put them into a 400 degree oven for 2-3 minutes. This high heat (Sapecada) deactivates the leaf enzymes and keeps the leaves from fermenting. Then drop the temperature to 100 degrees for 2-3 hours. Or, after the Sapeco of 400 degrees,  just allow the leaves to air dry for a couple weeks, where there is no direct sun. Placing a paper towel over top of the leaves will prevent dust from settling on the drying leaves.

Once dry, you can crumble your leaves to fill a gourd, or French press or make your own tea bags and enjoy your very own home-grown yerba mate.

tree-on-revel-berry
Being in the circus requires an endless wellspring of dedication and energy, and acrobat / stuntman Dmitrious Bistrevsky has that. He’s driven by a passion for performance, constantly training to work on an ever-growing repertoire of tricks. The results are dazzling: He can do handstands, back flips, complex balancing and juggling — and that’s just where his list begins.

We met Dmitrious at a circus festival in Los Angeles and were blown away by everything he could do. Not to mention, he’s 6’7! His focus is inspiring, as is his training schedule: He’s working out daily to improve his skill set and be ready for auditions and shows. While most of his energy comes from his regimen and determination, we also discovered he was occasionally dipping into coffee and a few notorious energy drinks with some not-so-great ingredients. We just had to step in.

We gave Dmitrious cans of Revel Berry, Enlighten Mint, Lemon Elation, and each of our sparkling yerba mate flavors, and he’s heeding the call: He’s feeling it! That pic on the right is Exhibit A, and we’ll be posting more of these on our Instagram feed as we get them. Hope he’s not considering juggling any sparkling yerba mate cans…

corrine_with_mate
In our work, we meet many people who experience mate deeply, and we get to hear so many stories that we love! Here’s one from our friend Corinne, a vegan and lover of organics hailing from LA.

I had never heard of mate 13 years ago. I also didn’t know anyone from Paraguay. That is, until I met a guy named Alfredo at a punk rock party in the San Fernando Valley. My life has been full of surprises ever since then. We have had many adventures together, from touring the country in a van with his band, to traveling to Paraguay to visit Alfredo’s family.

Alfredo told me about mate and how it’s part of his culture and upbringing. I had it with his mom and dad and siblings here in America from time to time when we hung out, but I really was able to experience how much it was a part of his life when we visited his extended relatives in Paraguay. They drank it in the morning, and the afternoon and at night. They drank it at parties, at the park and in the car. It was every where and there was always a reason to drink it!Traditionalparaguaydance

When Alfredo and I met, we were very different people. I was a vegetarian who didn’t drink or do anything too wild. Alfredo was a meat eater who lived his life in excess. He was always going from one extreme to another.  We co-existed very well though, and over time we’ve grown so much.

A couple of years ago, we decided it was time to go vegan for our health and the planet. We went from eating non-organic vegan food with a lot of processed fake meats, etc. to now being organic vegans who primarily eat whole foods. We try to buy locally too and be as sustainable as possible.

This is why organic mate is the way to go for us. Supporting communities in Third World countries, like Paraguay where Alfredo was born, and putting something chemical-free and healthy into our bodies just makes sense to us.

We feel so great when we drink it too! We are very athletic now and have found it works far better than coffee for us when it comes to long-lasting energy. I also love the fact that drinking from our gourd together is a bonding experience. Instead of doing something separate, it has a way of bring friends and family together.  It’s an old tradition that I see lasting for a very long time! Mate will always have a place in our hearts.

Since our inception, our fans have helped us save more and more rainforest each year. Last month, we tallied  everyone’s total impact for all of 2012, and the numbers blew us away! It’s nothing short of wonderful to feel our momentum growing and know that this year, we’ll save even more. But besides drinking more mate, what else can we possibly do to top numbers like these? As Luke shows us here at our annual team meeting, we’re saving over 24 million trees and protecting over 1 BILLION square feet of rainforest!

Luke presents our yerba mate drinkers' total impact in 2012 at Guayaki HQ

Many of us with a connection to the yerba mate plant can’t help but hear the call to help the forest as much as possible, which is just one reason the Guayaki Foundation established a page on GlobalGiving.org. Through the help of our fans, we’ve managed to establish a permanent presence on the site. Our donation page allows you to see where funds will be redistributed, and how much goes into protecting the harvest, and how every last dollar counts.

Guayaki drinkers are active participants in our mission and community, and this year, we’ll see it more than ever — from the rainforest protection already built into our business to the opportunity to raise more for the cause. As always, we’ll also be out in the world, sharing yerba mate with you, enjoying this planet, and discovering the many deep ways we can connect with it. Onward, to the forest!

 

Visit our donation drive on GlobalGiving.org to contribute: https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/guayaki/

 

 

 

The Guayaki teams in North and South America both work tirelessly and passionately for the same rainforest mission, but we don’t often get to spend time together. Our recent trip to visit the Ache Guayaki in Paraguay was a very special experience for us: we got to participate in the yerba mate harvest, connect with the rainforest, and for many of us, it was a chance to meet the rest of our Guayaki family for the first time.

We asked our team members who went to South America to send a picture that stirred a memory of the trip and tell us a story. Each felt something different; everyone felt something magical.

Luke

The photo I picked was taken the morning after we arrived. We had a long day of travel and an amazing day at the Iguazu falls the day before. That night, we met all the other people (now friends) at the lodge and shared our stories and just hung out learning about who we all are. We knew by the end of the night we had a very strong connection and the energy was building. The picture is of Alex and Boy under a umbrella of light, energy, spirit (you tell me) waiting to start a  trip down the Iguazu river.
Now after the trip I see the light as a bond taking place that we all became part of throughout the remaining days and time with our Ache Guayaki family.

don Miguel

Amongst all the photos that I took along the way, this one stands out to me as encapsulating the unity of our group with the Guayaki children.  Luke had the idea of walking around the village and looking for the church.  As we set out, the kids took us by the hand and led us along the way.  Through their village amongst the trees, we encountered pigs, chickens, and a big ol’ black cow grazing in the futbol field.  We saw a few men hard at work on their new school house, with a termo and guampa nearby for requisite breaktime.  Next to the schoolhouse, we saw the organic garden that had been planted in which the children took great pride.  The photo was taken as we had made a half lap around the village seeing the day to day goings on of the Guayaki people in their little piece of paradise in Paraguay.
 
 

Janal

I’m not sure who took this photo but I love it. It’s a beautiful moment when you find yourself coexisting with nature. Harvesting alongside the Ache makes you so keenly aware that you are part of something unique and how lucky you are to be embraced by this amazing community. It was the most gratifying work I’ve ever done and it gives my daily work an additional layer of personal meaning.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bernadette

That third and final morning was sublime as I had finally unwound and grounded into the experience.  It was a gestalt. There was the peacefulness of the rainforest and the bounty if offered in the newly harvested, aromatic mate. The feeling of shared purpose and  connection with the Ache community and those of us who came to participate. There was curiosity in the air.  Even though we were from different parts of the globe with very different lifestyles, we knew our lives were intimately connected. That was really cool to experience. 

This is one of my favorite photos, because of what it going on. This is a photo of the 1st milling/culling of the mate which is done by hand in the forest by the whole community; men, women and children (perhaps 6 and older).  The leaves are stripped from the branches and whole small stems with leaves are broken into 4 to 5 inch pieces in preparation for the flash drying. I loved participating!Us adults worked mostly quietly and repetitively.  The children laughed and played, feeling proud to be old enough to participate, and the teens poked fun with each other. I think I will always remember that crack, crack, cracking of the stems being snapped, the sounds of the forest and that pervasive feeling of connection. The sharing of a tasty mate gourd at break gave much needed energy to carry on with the labor and brought it full circle!

Mateo

This is one of my favorite pics because it captures Margarite and Alex, who is such a powerful visionary for the Next Economy and how we can live in balance and harmony with nature on this planet.  And Margarite struck all of us as such a powerful leader.  She was able to very succinctly summarize the Aché’s struggle: To protect the forest and to rise out of poverty while maintaining their indigenous traditions and way of life.  It is a pleasure to be working at the side of these two in working to support the Aché’s struggle, and the struggle we all face to save our planet from collapse and learn to live in a balanced way with all life on earth.

See more awesome pictures from our trip on Pinterest.